Thrawn Rickle 3


Green Politics
© 1990 Williscroft

The Greens are a loosely knit group of people that is being led by a smaller cadre of ideologues who got their social science from Marx and their physical science from science popularizes. They have built an anti-freedom, anti-democratic, anti-science world view on this.

From Marx they learned about the collective, the dialectic, and centralized control, without understanding the lessons from current history. From the life sciences they learned about a connection between chemicals and cancer, without understanding the nature of minute dangers and minuscule concentrations. From physics they learned that reality is not always what it seems to be, and drew misinformed analogues to eastern mysticism that reinforced their radically subjective and intuitive approach to deep ecology. From a marriage of Marxist theory and a misunderstanding of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that energy in the universe never increases, they developed a political-economic system incorporating no private land ownership and never expending energy. From a misapplication of quantum physics they derived a new world order that denies the cause and effect of market economics. From ecologists they gained a superficial understanding of the oneness of global processes and the living earth. Out of metaphor they created reality: the living earth became a goddess.

The common thread within the green movement is “stasis,” or “sustainability” in their jargon. Their earth doesn’t change; it shows little or no effect from human activity. They want to destroy human infrastructure – our markets, our cities, our communication networks, the very essence that makes us human. They propose to limit human movement by curtailing modern communication methods and modern transportation.

According to green prophet E.F. Schumacher, the ideal world is where people are “...relatively immobile...[where] the movement of populations, except in periods of disaster, [is] confined to persons [with] a very special reason to move, such as scholars.” In short, a place where only the intellectual elite – the eco-bosses – can move about.

Theirs is a simple world. People would not need to understand anything more complex than a shovel or a horse-pulled plow. If the world is sufficiently simple, ordinary people can understand its entirety. Failing this, if it is sufficiently subjective, ordinary people will be unable to understand it. In the first case, there will be no complexities like nuclear power or space exploration. In the second, people can be duped by the earnest leaders of the eco-movement into opposing things they don’t understand until stasis is reached.

David M. Graber is a research biologist for the National Park Service. He writes in the Los Angeles Times: “Human happiness, and certainly human fecundity, are not as important as a wild and healthy planet. We have become a plague upon ourselves and upon the Earth. Until such time as Homo sapiens should decide to rejoin nature, some of us can only hope for the right virus to come along.

”Graber’s implications are astonishing. To take his statements seriously is naive, but it is only a short step from wishing for the right virus to creating and distributing one. It only takes a few drops of anthrax virus in the Los Angeles water system to kill the entire population of Southern California.

Think about this the next time you hear a politician give lip service to the greens and their “good intentions.”